By Alex King

Report Released on the Interdependency of Medicaid NEMT and Community Transportation

January 21, 2020

CTAA thanks Health Affairs for the continued support and publication of this important analysis on the importance of medical transportation.

On Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, Health Affairs published a blog post titled, “Cutting Medicaid Non-emergency Medical Transportation Will Harm Community-Level Public Transportation.” The essay was written by CTAA Staff, Scott Bogren and Alexandra King, along with Michael Adelberg, who leads research for the Medical Transportation Access Coalition (MTAC), a multi-stakeholder organization that educates the public and policy makers on medical transportation.

CTAA thanks Health Affairs for the continued support and publication of this important analysis on the importance of medical transportation. As the post and report show, non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT) is interwoven into our transportation network systems.

As many of our members are well aware, curtailing Medicaid NEMT would have significant negative consequences beyond Medicaid, including reducing the funding and services of local transportation agencies. Local transportation providers depend on NEMT as a steady source of revenue (sometimes more than 50 percent of total funding) and to leverage federal transit funds used to expand access to rural populations.

Without Medicaid NEMT, transit services for all populations – including health care, employment, and other trip purposes – would be lost or substantially curtailed.

Please be sure to find the Health Affairs blog posted here, as well as the full report posted here (PDF).

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The Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA) and its members believe that mobility is a basic human right. From work and education to life-sustaining health care and human services programs to shopping and visiting with family and friends, mobility directly impacts quality of life.